Monday, November 25, 2013

An Avian Visitor

Often I wonder if they are there all along, hiding in plain sight, and I just don't see them. Or  am I some lucky gal who happened to be looking out the right window at the right time?
I have lived in this house for 12 years now and this is the first time I have seen an Eastern Towhee.

Female... Beautifully... Striking... Plumage.




The Eastern Towhee is found in eastern North America, usually in the underbrush. They are considered a large sparrow, and are smaller and more compact than a robin. They prefer wooded edges and scratch among the fallen debris on the ground in search of food.

























The male has a black back or hood, a white underbelly and rufous or red side patches that can be hidden by their wings. My visitor is a female and has a brown hood, rufous sides and a white belly.



How can I not help but admire this bird who knows a great bird bath
 when she sees one !!

12 comments:

  1. What a gorgeous little bird, Patty! Maybe she'll make a detour and fly a bit north to visit me as well!

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  2. Astrid, I suspect she is already heading south. According to the bird map, the towhee only summers in our area. I'll give her your address next year.

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  3. You are very lucky. I have never seen one. Perhaps they are moving more North and hopefully they will become more common in Ontario.

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    1. Maybe so Alain. Nothing seems to remain the same today with climate change.

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  4. They are such an elusive bird too by how you described their foraging habits. I saw my first on last summer and at first was not sure what I was seeing since it hopped about hiding in the brush. I do believe they are moving further North, but after this winter, who knows. You are lucky it came to your feeder and birdbath. The pan is a cute idea.

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    1. Perhaps we will see more of the Towhees in the near future. I would like to see the male Towhee now. Maybe more frying pan bird baths will be the lure to the northern garden.

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  5. What a beautiful bird. I often wonder the same. Some birds don't show themselves that often. You are a lucky gal. A lucky gal with an unusual bird bath.

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    1. Hi Denise, She is very pretty. I hope to see her again next year. Maybe with a mate too.

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  6. Ha! I agree--great bird bath! This season we've been lax about getting the bird seed out. While the birds seem perfectly happy gathering seeds and fruits from the plants, I haven't had as good of a vantage point for viewing them. I will refill the feeders today! ;-) How nice that you had such a fun visitor!

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    1. I try to keep the feeder filled as I don't as yet have enough bushes and trees that actually feed my wildlife. The pole for the feeder does create a nice photo opportunity though. Thanks for visiting Beth.

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