Monday, February 3, 2014

Let the Catalogue Orders Begin

My first catalogue order of the year is one of pure practicality. Old fashioned bleeding hearts and Virginia bluebells. If you can get them to bloom at the same time they look great together. If that won't work for you then the options are limitless, especially for the woodland gardeners out there.

Dicentra spectabilis

Mertensia virginiana

Here they are together. A soft pastel combination that is pleasing to the eye.

source:whiteflowerfarm.com

I stumbled on a great alternative two years ago, my native bleeding heart Dicentra eximia with another native Jacob's Ladder or Polemonium reptans. It's a combination I plan on reproducing again this year.


If you plant Bleeding hearts and bluebells together remember that the Virginia bluebells are spring ephemerals and will die down before the bleeding hearts finish flowering. Have some other shade or woodland plants like ferns, hostas, or ginger planted nearby to fill the hole.

12 comments:

  1. I never thought of mixing them but you are right bleeding hearts and Virginia bluebells look very good together. I have lost my bleeding heart. I am always amazed by what does well in a garden and not in an other. In our old garden numerous new bleeding hearts volunteered every spring and we would give them away. Unfortunately, they do not like the new garden. However Virginia bluebells are happier than in the old one!

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    1. Alain, I lost my pink Japanese bleeding heart when I redid the back garden and have pined for it ever since. However my white ones give me babies. I have troubles like you with the bluebells but eager to keep trying.

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  2. Lovely combinations! I have several patches of Lamprocapnos spectabilis, and one patch of the Dicentra eximia. I planted seeds of Mertensia virgiana in the fall, and I'm looking forward to finding out if they will germinate and grow. Great ideas in this post, Patty!

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    1. I had not realized they changed the genus name. Quite the mouthful. I would love to find out if your Mertensia seedlings take Beth.

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  3. Hello Patty girl !
    Your blog is looking so pretty with that header pattern !
    That is a very pretty combination .. I have no Blue Bells here .. yet ? LOL
    Yes .. I too am very curious about Cheyenne echinacea .. wondering if it will self seed and if it is true that it flowers in the first year .. if it does, I might have to open a plant stand and start selling them ? LOL ... in any case it is exciting to plan a revamp of our gardens with new and old plants : )
    Joy
    PS .. I had to look up your specific type of bleeding heart .. I had no idea that they were in the poppy family native to Siberia, China, Korea ... plants are so amazing !

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    1. The new header is a Medieval illumination, kinda cool eh? I look forward to hearing what else you order this year.

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  4. Great pictures, great ideas, great combinations!! Bring on Spring (as I write this, we are getting another 20 cm of snow….sigh…..)

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    1. I just came in from an early morning drive. Removed a good 4 inches of snow off the steps and car, and did it again later this morning. Stay home today :)

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  5. Mertensia is a native wildlflower here and can be found covering entire fields. I've never seen it grown with bleeding hearts but it is a beautiful combination. I finally found a spot that makes my Jacob's Ladder happy and am looking forward to seeing that bloom this year. Love that last photo. So pretty!

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    1. How I would love to see fields of bluebells ! Jacob Ladder reptans is a "creeping" species except that is doesn't creep. It is just smaller in stature and weeps a bit.

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  6. What an opportunity I have missed! I have bleeding hearts and Virginia Blue bells, but they are not exactly together. I love the blue bells and planned to add more. Now I know just where to put them. Thanks Patty!

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  7. Hi Patty… I just saw your comment on my older post and question… indeed, White Lights azalea does start out with a strong peachy tone and fades over time… it never seems to get to be a true white but is lovely all the same and seems to do the best for me of any in the series.

    I had totally forgotten about blue eyed grass which I used to grow but apparently it has disappeared… thanks for the reminder as I always liked it!

    Also thanks for the valentine wishes… hope your Valentine's Day was nice as well… Larry

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