Thursday, February 13, 2014

Pink and Blue

This post is on plant combination number 3. I realized that all three plant combinations include a blue flowering plant: Virginia Bluebells, Blue-Eyed Grass and now Willowleaf Bluestar.

Blue, in all its shades and hues from royal purple to light blue or violet, is actually a great supporting plant.  True blue is a primary colour. It works best with the softer hues of pink, pale yellow, white and creams. Think spring time. You will find its neighbour purple or violet on the colour wheel opposite the reds. Planting these complementary colours creates stronger contrasts which typically are found in summer and fall gardens.




Above left is Willowleaf Bluestar or Amsonia Tabernaemontana . A great plant for its willow-like leaves and pale blue star shaped flowers in spring. This is one of those sway- in- the- breeze plants, and mine grows over 3 feet tall and wide. I have heard of its wonderful yellow leaf colour in the fall but this has not been my experience. It gets little TLC apart from some compost at its base every year or two, and bugs and diseases seem to leave it alone. To its right is a perennial Geranium sanguineum 'Max Frei' and a dwarf Willowleaf Bluestar.


 
My dwarf Amsonia is not a cultivar like , for example 'Blue Ice', but rather Amsonia tabernaemontana var. montana. I think that puts it in the natural hybrid category, but really who cares! This baby tops out at 1 foot in my garden and stands more at attention than its larger cousin. Plus its flowers are a darker blue when in bud. Teamed with these bluestars is the Geranium Max Frei, a vibrant hue of pink especially on cloudy days, that makes the entire combination pop.



 

The geranium is also a tough as nails plant, and like the bluestars does not need coddling or fussing. Just a trim after flowering to tidy it up for a second flowering is all you need to do. This great combination blooms in spring May to early June in my garden.

9 comments:

  1. Love the combo and you remind me to put my amsonias in better spots that show them off...right now they are being crowded out by other plants.

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    1. I do find the amsonia's very well behaved plants. They don't grow more then their specified limits on the tags. But then my soil is not rich and I don't coddle.

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  2. Your Amsonia grows very well. So far, I have not had much luck with Amsonia. However last spring I started some from seed that looked OK last fall. Hopefully, they will still be there this spring. It combines beautifully with cranesbill.

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    1. I hope your seedlings make it too Alain. Thankfully all this snow will help protect the plants.

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  3. Lubię niebieskie kwiaty, a połączenie ich z różowymi, to świetny pomysł, bo ożywia to miejsce w ogrodzie. Pozdrawiam.
    I like blue flowers, and combining them with pink, it's a great idea because it gives life to the place in the garden. Yours.

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  4. I have a lot of amsonia, too, and added even more last fall. But mine is all 'Blue Ice'. It's such a tough plant. I love how tall your red columbine is! I hope mine gets that tall, too!

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    1. The columbine is the native wild columbine. I let is seed itself around every year and move the ones that are not best situated. It can get tall - I think it is around the 3 foot mark in that photo.

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  5. Great combination--both the blooms and the foliage! I don't have Amsonia in my garden, but I really like it.

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    1. It is a nice foliage plant even without the flowers. Tidy too.

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