Tuesday, June 17, 2014

A Visit to Bruekner Rhododendron Gardens

It was only 2 years ago that I heard about the Bruekner Rhododendron Gardens located in Mississauga, Ontario. My dad told me about it, his hiking group had included it in one of their spring hikes.
As with most gardens this one has a history. From the website:

In 2008, Rhododendron Garden in Mississauga Ontario Canada was renamed Brueckner Rhododendron Gardens to honour a long time Mississauga resident and master rhododendron hybridizer, the late Dr. Joseph Brueckner. This Garden, formerly known as Cranberry Cove, enjoys a micro climate favourable to growing rhododendrons, azaleas, and other species of trees native to a Carolinian forest such as various types of beech trees and Kentucky coffee trees.

Many of Dr Brueckner's beloved rhodos were donated to, and are grown, in these gardens.

While it turned out that my visit to the garden coincided with its best show for the year, the winters harshness was still quite visible. Many of the plants had brown leaves from winter burn or sun scald.  The garden has a number of beds, some more formal than others. Rhododendrons and azaleas were accompanied by Pieris, Solomon's Seal, Bleeding Heart, and a variety of Hosta.










Pieris on the right with rhodos of all sizes





Eye popping colour on this azalea


Winter burn damage is easily seen here







If you want a look at their website here is the link


14 comments:

  1. Incredible! I love Rhododendrons and Azaleas. They must have developed hardier varieties. Great post!

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    1. There are some native rhododendrons to North America, mostly in the US. Here in Canada there are two I believe, but they are not used to hybridize, again , I believe. I intend to add more to my garden soon.

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  2. I the winterburn because of the severe winter over there this year? The plant seem to be recovering well.

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    1. Hi Denise, yes, we had a long cold winter. That with traditionally sunny days helps to create sun scald on the trees and shrubs. I have heard from friends and neighbours of full or partial loss of plants. Many do recover they just don't look so pretty for awhile.

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  3. It looks like a very interesting garden. You must have enjoyed your visit.
    I have a few rhododendrons but the soil being very basic here, they are not all that happy. One of them looked as if it had been killed by the cold last winter but it is now budding allover.

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    1. My own rhodos show some winter burn (brown leaf tips or entire) and my labrador tea always gets it if it not protected. The gardens are quite large for being in the city, right on the lake with some nice views.

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  4. I have never been to this garden, but I have heard about it. Rhododendrons and azaleas are so much more challenging to grow here than in places like Nova Scotia and British Columbia. They absolutely seem to thrive there. Rhodos and azaleas have such beautiful flowers however, it seems worthwhile to think about lavishing them with a bit more attention to get them to grow here.

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    1. They are finicky in some ways. I am lucky to have an area where it is more acidic. Last year I managed to fine some pine mulch, and I do add some soil acidifier from time to time.

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  5. What a beautiful place! I had two rhodies but they died in an ice storm several years ago. I just don't have the right spot for them.

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  6. My favourite plants Patty, They performed better in the cooler conditions of our Aberdeen garden compared to our new Cheshire place.

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  7. Beautiful photos, Patty. I had a Northern Lights azalea for a while but it did not increase in size or bloom after the first 2 years.

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  8. Gorgeous! Rhodies have such vibrant color. We don't grow them much around here because of the alkaline soil, but where I grew up on Long Island NY there were lots of Azaleas and great big Rhododendrons. .

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  9. I love the Rhodies and Azalea. I wish the Azalea grew better here. The Rhodies get too big generally speaking. I have had small varieties, yet the were not that hardy or long-lived.

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  10. Thanks for leaving a comment on my blog again, I can see you are no longer actively blogging but I hope you will be back again soon :-)

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