Monday, February 1, 2016

Lessons Learned

Lessons learned.
Last year the front porch area made a demand. "This large brick wall expanse is too much to look at. Fix it". I had to agree. It was too much brick to look at. Even hubby commented on this.
Surprisingly hubby had the answer. Grow a clematis. OK but that means grow a clematis in a pot, and I kill plants in pots. So I decided to buy the most ubiquitous clematis there is in the hope that it would survive, even thrive. Welcome Clematis Jackmanii.




Without the help of more photos I can attest that Jackmanii did thrive and bloom all summer and fall. Great choice Patty! (um, thanks hubby for the input).

However, that is not the end of the story. Fall arrives, cool temperatures waft in and it is time to put the clematis in winter storage. End of November it warms up 10C or so, so out goes the clematis (and other assorted pots with plants on trial). Clematis still looks great. It is green and lush still. And it has flower buds.

Early December Jackmanii is back indoors. It is a cumbersome pot to move on your own I find. The tomato cage is not helping either. I plan to check on the clematis after Christmas to see if it needs water. When I do I find this.



He isn't the best looking Jackmanii flower I have seen. But it is amazing that the clematis continued to grow.
So, lesson learned: You can grow and flower clematis in December.

(I bet you thought I was going to mention potted plants)

16 comments:

  1. Wow, that is awesome! What a beautiful bloom, especially since it was a surprise. I find myself doing more and more experimentation with potted plants and bulbs as time goes by. I've never been terribly successful with indoor plants, but they seem to thrive in my closed-off sunroom, where the temperatures are a little cooler and the air is a little more humid during the winter than it is in the fully heated house. Bravo on your blooms!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As gardeners we should be used to failure. Experimentation is key, and it sounds like you are finding success. Bravo to you as well.

      Delete
  2. That is a very pleasant surprised for December. Congratulations!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I tried clematis Jackmanii in a pot and did not have success, so I salute you! Mine ended up in the ground climbing a 5 foot tower, and it quickly swamped that. I had to take it out because it was way too big -- it will be interesting to see if yours stays smaller in the container. Since you've done really well with it so far, I'm hoping the size and flowering are just right next season! It's a gorgeous flowering vine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Laurrie, I kind of expect it to grow larger next spring than the pot and tomato cage can handle. But it will probably twine itself around itself which is fine.

      Delete
  4. It's nice to know you are able some important lesson that you can use in your future garden projects. Learn from it and apply the lessons you've learned so you won't be able to commit the same mistakes and have the same failures in your next gardening endeavor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for stopping by Farm Plans - all the way from New Zealand!

      Delete
  5. That's awesome!! What a fun surprise!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes. Although a stressed Jackmanii clematis growing in sub optimal conditions does not sport beautiful dark purple blooms.

      Delete
  6. what a nice surprise. Even though Jackmanii is viewed as common it is still one of my favorites---great color.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The colour pops out well against that brick wall and is one of the reasons I got it.

      Delete
  7. Hello Patty girl ! ... So we both usually kill plants in pots .. haha .. I can get away with some tough ones but this year I did what you did with a more rambunctious clematis Madame Julia Correvon .. it is out in the elements, we don't have a garage so this is an experiment to see what is going to happen to it.
    Yours is doing wonderfully and imagine seeing a flower in December ? wow ! I would love that too !
    So ... after this weird winter passes I will be curious to see if Julia has survived it and me some how : )
    Joy
    PS .. I have a lot of brick in the front too but I usually just pop a BIG Boston fern there, the garden eats up most of my time so I need something easy there.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I considered Julia Correvon. I love the color but I was afraid it would fade. The brick wall happens to be the sunniest spot on my property. Go figure.
    .

    ReplyDelete
  9. How fabulous....with our warm winter, my clematis started to put on new growth...can you believe that, here where we have lots of cold and snow!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is weird and amazing. You will have to let us know if it flowers on time.

      Delete