Monday, April 25, 2016

Vernation

Magical moments of spring in the garden for me is watching the plants push themselves up through the soil, still furled, like a mohair throw wrapped tightly around the body on a cold day. This tension helps to propel their shoots upwards - I wonder if they feel themselves relax as they unwind. 


Variegated Solomon's Seal shoots are red as they push through last years debris and trout lilies

Bloodroot stand like ladies with their capes pulled around them to keep warm





As a day passes another group have started to unfurl


 


Perhaps a red trillium under there ?

Labrador Tea is a small shrub with small rough leaves that hide a woolly indumentum on the undersurface. The flower buds are small and tight waiting for the warmth of the sun before opening.

A large leaved rhododendron with its pink flower hiding under the tight wrapping

Leaf buds of the alternate leaf dogwood 
Wild ginger leaves open in odd forms similar to opening a folded tissue

Ginger more fully open with small round buds showing below that I believe are the flowers, a brownish flower that remains hidden below the foliage until you lift it to see

Vernation (from vernal meaning spring, since that is when leaves spring forth in temperate regions) is the formation of new leaves or fronds. In plant anatomy, it is the arrangement of leaves in a bud.


8 comments:

  1. Oh, I love this stage, too. There's little to no sign of them one day, and then the next they're poking out of the soil. In the case of Bloodroot, one day they're nowhere to be seen, the next they're emerging, next day they're buds, next they're blooming, and then they're forming seeds. They have such a short blooming time (at least here). Ephemerals are so, so special. :)

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    1. I was lucky in a way to be able to catch these plants at this stage. To paraphrase you, they are fleeting.Thanks for stopping by.

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  2. Nice unusual (for me) plants you have Patty. I have a different ginger (Asarum europaeum).

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    1. I have been tempted by your gingers Denise with their darker shiny leaves. Do they open in the same manner?

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  3. Hello Patty girl ;; I am so jealous of all that glorious Bloodroot you have, they are going to look wonderful !!
    Today (Tuesday) it is one degree and the rain has turned to snow .. but at least we got some rain which will propel our plants even further "up" and that always makes us smile.
    I have to get some Bloodroot and Ginger some day .. yours looks amazing : )

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    1. If you do get the Bloodroot and Ginger you won't be disappointed. Both make lovely groundcovers and will spread slowly. We are sharing the same temps this morning but we are only getting the rain. Oh Joy!

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  4. It really is a special time when all the early flowers start to unfurl. It seems relaxing as you say too. I have been waiting for the trout lilies. Hope mine get blooming.

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